Tagged: hosting

I’m Back

The blog has been down for a few days. Once or twice a year I like to give my technology a break. Let the electrons spin free for a while that sort of thing.

I thought I would move the blog from bluehost to webbynode and so I've spent the past few days trying to do just that. I had high hopes for using webbynode as a low cost host where I could put my blog and then stage a Rails site or run a few experiments. After several tries rebuilding the server and trying different deploys I gave up and now I'm back to my old account.

I still think Webbynode is a great service. They make putting up a Rails app a trivial process. I don't think that running a php app (WordPress in my case) next to your Rails app is very good idea unless you move up to the larger plans which means spending a lot of money just to run a blog. If you're going to end up paying that much more you may as well keep a basic account for the blog and run a separate account for your Rails experiments.

Anyway, e...

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Heroku

I've watched Heroku for a while. I've even tried to deploy an app there a few times, but never got into it that much. I needed a cheap (free) place to put My Amazon Feeds.com. It's just a utility site. It's not meant to scale or be production worthy. Instead it's meant to show off some code and I didn't want to spend a long time messing with deployment.

Turns out deployment on Heroku is pretty simple if you don't need a lot of custom setup. Their instructions are pretty clear so I won't repeat them. There are a few things you will want to keep in mind:

  1. You will need to create a file in the root called .gems. Mine looks like this:
    
    mislav-will_paginate --source http://gems.github.com
    httparty
    river
    
  2. Heroku uses PostgreSQL. If you have MySQL specific code or even some sloppy migrations you might have a few problems.
  3. The Heroku file system is read-only. This has some interesting side effects include the fact that your caching will ...

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EngineYard -Your new IT Team

Back in the day I was impressed by EngineYard but couldn't afford to use them. Now I can't afford to not use them. I use them for several projects. We have the full 3 slice stack setup with one project - 2 production and 1 staging database. The service they provide is like going to a 4 star hotel. If you need something they do it. If you screw up your database they fix it. You don't have to worry about backups. The crew at Engineyard takes care of that. You need a task to copy the production database to your local machine? It's already done.

More recently I've started using Solo to host Genlighten (more to come on Genlighten soon). Solo sits on top of Amazon's ec2 service. You might ask why you should pay more for EngineYard's stack when you can just use Amazon's services. That's a good question. Although Solo doesn't come with the same level of support as the main EngineYard product you will find Ezra (vice president) answering questions in the ...

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Scalr – Scalable Hosting Framework for Amazon Web Services

Amazon's web services business has sparked a number of business opportunities. Using EC2 and S3 is not especially easy for a beginner, but scalable web architectures aren't a place for the weak hearted geek.

Enter Scalr. This is an open source project meant to make building a scalable, fault tolerant system on Amazon's services easier.

If that is still too hard then take a look at scalr.net a service that for $50 a month will manage your scalr instance for you. (You still have to pay all the applicable Amazon charges.

All this comes to us from Intridea which also produces SocialSpring the platform behind Acts as Community.

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Scalr – Scalable Hosting Framework for Amazon Web Services

Amazon's web services business has sparked a number of business opportunities. Using EC2 and S3 is not especially easy for a beginner, but scalable web architectures aren't a place for the weak hearted geek.

Enter Scalr. This is an open source project meant to make building a scalable, fault tolerant system on Amazon's services easier.

If that is still too hard then take a look at scalr.net a service that for $50 a month will manage your scalr instance for you. (You still have to pay all the applicable Amazon charges.

All this comes to us from Intridea which also produces SocialSpring the platform behind Acts as Community.

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A Few More Thoughts On Morph Exchange

I am working on a quick Facebook application for a company called Flat World Knowledge. Basically I have 4 days to build the application - it has to be done by Tuesday. Because of the simplicity of deployment on Morph Exchange I decided to deploy the application on their platform. I don't have time to setup a full Rails deployment environment.

One problem. Facebook applications require access to the Facebook API. I used rfacebook because that is the library I have used in the past and could quickly get the application done. (Facebooker is another library worth looking at if you are building a Facebok Application). I deployed the application but it wouldn't start. I did some checking and finally found their deployment log. Turns out the Facebook gems are not installed. There is a way to package up your gems into your project. (This site will help as well.) With the popularity of Facebook applications growing and the need for scalability on demand I would think that having the Fa...

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A Few More Thoughts On Morph Exchange

I am working on a quick Facebook application for a company called Flat World Knowledge. Basically I have 4 days to build the application - it has to be done by Tuesday. Because of the simplicity of deployment on Morph Exchange I decided to deploy the application on their platform. I don't have time to setup a full Rails deployment environment.

One problem. Facebook applications require access to the Facebook API. I used rfacebook because that is the library I have used in the past and could quickly get the application done. (Facebooker is another library worth looking at if you are building a Facebok Application). I deployed the application but it wouldn't start. I did some checking and finally found their deployment log. Turns out the Facebook gems are not installed. There is a way to package up your gems into your project. (This site will help as well.) With the popularity of Facebook applications growing and the need for scalability on demand I would think that having the Fa...

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Morph Exchange Review

I recently wrote about Cloud Computing. Alain Benedict from Morph Exchange told me that I neglected to add his company to the list. I said I would check it out. He said he would hold me to it. Last night I spent a little quality with Morph and now have a few impressions to share.

First, adding your application to Morph is a bit confusing. It is setup as an 'application exchange' so instead of signing up for hosting you 'subscribe' to the Morph DevCenter. Once you do that you create a new 'Appspace'. Once you get past the oddity of how to get going the next part is very easy. You click one button to create the database. Then you click another to download a Capistrano file. By default it is named morph_deploy.rb but I renamed mine to just deploy so I don't have to tell Capistrano the name of the file every time I want to deploy. Add the deploy.rb to your project, edit it and set your subversion repository, do a cap deploy:morph, enter your username and passwor...

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Elastic Cloud Computing

One of the most difficult tasks when putting up a new site is picking the right host. Moving hosts later on is terribly difficult so choosing the correct hosting company is as important as selecting a business partner. I've collected about 30 hosting companies in my delicious bookmarks. Some are specific to a platform others are really cheap. I recorded them because they looked interesting.

The latest movement in web hosting is towards cloud hosting. This is the holy grail for the user and for the hosting company. Imagine a web host that scales as you grow. Everyone would love nothing more than a host that could handle getting slammed by Digg.

Amazon's ec2 service offers scalable services, but it is not a simple as your typical web hosting company. The Ruby gem ec2onrails will simplify the process of getting your Ruby on Rails application up an running. RightScale builds on ec2 to make it easy to deploy your application. They add a dashboard and make it easy to load balance and...

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